Essential Oil Brands – Lea’s Opinion

brands

Before I present you with my lists of brands I personally use and personally do not use, I want to tell you some of the things that have influenced my decision on how many stars to give companies:

  • the level of accuracy of the safety information provided on the essential oil profile pages
  • the safety information provided on the label of the bottles
  • the selection of essential oils (if they offer neurotoxic essential oils for sale)
  • the involvement of aromatherapy professionals in their business
  • if they offer GC/MS reports right on their website
  • the quality of their essential oils
  • if they acknowledge essential oils do expire and have a shelf life
  • and other red and green flag specifications here.

Please realize this is ONLY MY OPINION, which I am sharing because I get asked this a lot. My opinion is covered under the 1st amendment, and this is not a “BUY” and “DO NOT BUY” list. Please do your own research and come to your own conclusions.

Companies with a 5-star rating are allowed to use the UEOS safety seal of approval on their websites, bottles, and in their marketing. A sample of the seal can be found below:

sm_safetyseal

There are no 5 star companies at this time. I am sure this will change.

If you think your company belongs here, please contact Lea and have her review your company today!

These are the companies I personally choose to purchase from, in order of rating from 4 stars to 3 (below three stars I would  not purchase from, and you can find those companies listed in the next section). Note: these ratings may changes as companies change.

4 stars

  • Florihana (via Tropical Traditions) – they offer a ton of EO-specific information, including GCMS reports. Another report lists uses, and precautions. Lemon includes phorotoxicity, but neglects to include what the safe dilution is (2%). It also says not to use “in children under 6 years” – but I believe that is their stance on all EOs, not particular to Lemon. Same goes for them saying “do not use in pregnant women.” Find them on Tropical Traditions
  • Wingsets – owned by an aromatherapist who has been in the business for a long time. I love her non-EO products with a passion, and her blends rock. VERY THOROUGH descriptions, clear ingredients, and safety usage guidelines. Only thing I wish to see happen is GCMS reports. But I know Ann does her homework in choosing great suppliers. Find them on their website.
  • Aromatics International – One of the first to offer GCMS reports, linked to batch #s on the bottles. Very thorough chemical family breakdown (for what its worth). Recipes, therapeutic properties, and safety advice offered. I’ve always been impressed with the safety info for their singles, and just now am looking at their blends. I am disappointed. One example is their Cold and Flu Prevention Blend contains Ravintsara with high 1,8-cineole content and 1% dilution recommendation and no safety warnings are included. No dilution is revealed. No age minimums given. Another drawback is the price, but they have some EOs that you can’t find anywhere else. Find them on their website.
  • Aura Cacia – Myrrh tested just as good as DT and YL Myrrh, for way less the cost. They do offer some educational information, but it needs to be re-vamped and updated. They don’t reveal how much their pre-diluted EOs are diluted, although they do say “in the 3-5% range.” This is probably fine for many uses, but not for using on children and you want a 1% (or lower) dilution. They have a great start, have been around a long time, but need some tweaking – namely adding GCMS reports to their website. You can find them on their website, on amazon, and on vitacost.
  • Eden Botanicals – Offers good safety information and usage recommendations, and lots of good information in their website. Their Certificate of Analysis doesn’t include a complete GC/MS, but does include several of the main constituents. They also offer samples. You can find them on their website.
  • Lemongrass Spa – A direct sales company I have been involved in before they introduced essential oils to their customers, I have consulted for them and given presentations to the consultants to teach them about safety. Not the most affordable essential oils and blends, but they do have the eye for safety. You can find them here.

3 stars

  • Mountain Rose Herbs – They have excellent customer service, and responded appropriately when their Peppermint was found to be “not in compliance” during our 3rd party testing. That being said, it is important to note that it failed due to their purchasing a lesser-quality Peppermint, as their usual stock was out, and they didn’t want to hang the “out of stock” sign up. They do offer decent product information in their EO pages, HOWEVER their safety information needs an over-haul. Their Eucalyptus page mentions nothing of caution with kids under 10 (or any age), and they say to avoid while pregnant (huh?). Flip side, is the safety info on Fennel is pretty good, although no dilution recommendations are given. They are also not as affordable as some other brands. I’d like to see them remove some of the less safe essential oils. You can find them on their website.
  • Essential Oil Exchange – They are affordable, and were only one of 3 out of 12 to pass our 3rd party Peppermint testing. That said, they do offer essential oils that have serious safety concerns, such as Pennyroyal. ZERO warning is given – in fact, there is no info at all except the  botanical name, origin, and method of extraction. Bergamot, however, does have constituents listed, although no percentages. Phototoxicity is mentioned, but only that “care must be taken” – but no safe dilution given (0.4%). You can find them on their website.
  • Edens Garden – They hired me in the summer of 2015 to update their safety information and education, but as of March 2016 they have replaced that detailed information with a generic “consult your health care provider” type message. Very disappointed 🙁 They have recently released a line for kids, but some of the essential oils used are questionable. Some are phototoxic and/or have drug interactions (without need!). Further, although they are adamant that you dilute to 1% if purchasing the undiluted blend, the pre-diluted roller bottles are at 5% and 10%. They do offer GC/MS reports, though. Find them on their website and on amazon.
  • Essential Vitality –  This is the brand which beat out DT and YL (and two other) brands during our Myrrh testing. That said, they are pricey, no dilution % is given for pre-diluted blends, and non child-safe EOs are being used on children (“Bitten” blend). So the quality seems to be there (no GCMS tests are provided), but the educational info needs to be present. You can find them on this website.
  • Wyndmere – They have a lot of great information, as well as a couple of YouTube videos on safety, including stressing that essential oils are concentrated and not to ingest. Their Bergamot does mention phototoxicity, but no topical max is given. There is no chemotype listed for Basil. Birch is offered for sale, and “harmful in concentration, use sparingly is noted,” but specific detail is lacking. I like that they offer Cinnamon Leaf, but not Cinnamon Bark. Clove is offered, but suggested to avoid if pregnant, and no mention of avoiding with children. However, their general recommendation is not to use essential oils on kids under two – it should be on the product page, though. No warnings about using Peppermint around children. No dilution given for the roll-ons they sell. You can find them on their website.
  • NYR Organics – A direct sales company. Was one of the 3 out of 13 to test well in our 3rd party testing for Peppermint.  They offer bergapten-free Bergamot, which is not phototoxic (good). Their safety information is mixed. They are clearly trying. I am not liking the ingredients listing showing individual constituents added to the essential oils – however perhaps I am misunderstanding that constituent listing. They ask you dilute carefully, and offer low dilution suggestions,but no warning about Eucalyptus use with children. You can find them on their webiste.
  • Plant Therapy – The owner got a lot of free positive PR from this group after their Tea Tree was found Not in Compliance and they pulled their stock, to great financial loss. They  made a lot of good moves, including hiring Robert Tisserand to formulate their “KidSafe” line. They do have great customer service and good prices. That all said, they have some conflicting safety information, market roller bottles for blends that are best diffused, and suggesting higher than usual dilution % in blends marketed to children as young as age 2. Their “Germ Fighter” includes Cassia, the cheapest form of Cinnamon with no warnings given. They suggest adding EOs to bottom of the feet to boost immune system, so it looks like they have more room for improvement. The newest safety blow is their Ear Ease formula – the first ever essential oil blend to be marketed for placing inside the ear. This goes against what all aromatherapists are taught. As of today, 8/28/2016, it has caused outrage from professionals like myself as well as customers. Time will tell if they pull the blend. You can find them on their website and on amazon.

These are the companies I personally choose to NOT purchase from. Please refer to this list of things I look for when making this decision for myself to understand why these companies are in this list.

  • Native American Nutritionals & Rocky Mountain Oils
  • Spark Naturals
  • NOW & NOW Organic
  • doTerra
  • Young Living
  • Heritage aka Hopewell
  • Nature’s Gift
  • OVI
  • Melaleuca
  • It Works 
  • Swanson
  • Jade Bloom

Note: if these companies make changes, such as hiring a certified aromatherapist to consult for adding safety information etc., I am open to moving them into my star ratings section. Yes, I am personally available to hire for consulting on a first-come first-serve basis.

Reminder: this is ONLY MY OPINION, which I am sharing because I get asked this a lot. My opinion is covered under the 1st amendment, and this is not a “BUY” and “DO NOT BUY” list. Please do your own research and come to your own conclusions.

If you can’t find your brand listed here, read: How to Tell if an Essential Oil Company is Worth Purchasing From – just by checking their website

Some of the reference links above are affiliate links (to amazon, Vitacost, and Tropical Traditions). However, I am not a rep of any company, and not partial to just one brand. If you do decide to make a purchase, it does not cost you any more, and helps support the work I do, and I appreciate it. If you do not wish to support my efforts, just google search for the company name and get there your own way 🙂